Interview to offer! What are companies looking for beyond the resume?

Are you likable? Will you come in and create tension or cause undue stress to existing staff or will you fit in well with the team? Will you walk around and look miserable on a daily basis or send an upbeat, positive message?   These are questions that employers are asking themselves during the interview process.Offer check listYou may have the work experience, the proven track record of success on paper, and be the best at what you do, so you land that illusive interview.  But this is not enough to get you the offer.  Due to the growing demand for the “right talent”, there’s a lot more needed, than ever before, to turn your interview into an offer.  To improve your chances, know what employers are ‘keying in on’ during your interview and get the offer in 2014.

The following are key traits firms want to see in you.

Let’s start with what’s your “likability” factor?

As a recruiter, companies have said time and time again, especially this past year, that they are passing on candidates because they simply are “not the right fit”.  These candidates have the experience and track record of success, but after digging deeper, are not hired due to a poor attitude or because of what they said about previous employers.  Companies today want employees to come on board and fit in with the team.  Given today’s “lean and mean” approach, employees have to work closely together to create efficiency and ensure the work is done, and done well.  When one person comes in with a poor attitude or is “high maintenance”, it creates undue stress on all and it’s not good for company morale.  Bottom line, leave the attitude at the door.

How enthusiastic are you about the job opportunity?

Employers invest a lot in finding the “right talent”, and for them it is important that future employees can see themselves in a role for the long-term.  They are not looking for candidates who are thinking that this is “just a job”.  As a result, hiring managers are asking direct questions and looking for answers that revolve around candidates being extremely satisfied doing the role they are looking to fill. If they sense that a candidate is a potential “flight risk” in the short term, forget about getting the offer.

Think about it…why would an employer hire a candidate knowing that they will be keeping their options open, even after they’ve accepted the offer?  There’s a lot of competition.  Companies want to hire the candidate that wants the job for the right reasons.  Show employers you want the job and want it for the long-term.

Whats Your Work EthicHow about your work ethic?

Employers don’t just want an employee to show up and do the minimum work each day.  They want to hire people that are hungry to do more than the typical job duties.  Are you someone that will help others out on your down time?  Will you go above and beyond to find ways to make things more efficient?  When interviewing, provide examples of how you’ve gone above and beyond in your past jobs.  Be enthusiastic when presenting those examples. Show the interviewer that you WANT this job and that you are willing to do whatever it takes to make everyone around you better.

Look yourself in the mirror and ask the important questions…Are you likable, enthusiastic and do you have a great work ethic? If so, make it known in your interviews.  During your next interview, reflect on what the decision maker sitting across from you is thinking.  Be prepared to present the best “you” possible.  This, and only this, will get you the offer.

Happy job hunting and much success in 2014!

Source: johnleonard.com

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